pH:
The Measurement of
Alkalinity and Acidity

There is nothing magical about the term "pH". It is the chemist's shorthand for "Potential of Hydrogen". It is the measurement used to determine the relative alkalinity, acidity or neutrality of a solution.

Below is a pH chart showing the pH range of 0 to 14 and some familiar substances with their respective pH values to give you a better "feel" of what each pH unit really represents.

Please note the upper pH limit of 10 for stain-resist nylon carpet.

Yet, all other things being equal, the higher the pH, the better the cleaning.

Also, note that there is a 10-fold increase in alkalinity or acidity for each pH unit change. In other words, a solution at a pH of 14 is 10,000,000 times as alkaline as one at a pH of 7.

Note the very low pH of vomit. Because of its low pH, any staining agent in vomit will be MUCH more difficult to remove, because the lower the pH, the more set a dye will be. Just a pleasant thought before dinner!

Power
pH
Substance
A
10,000,000
0
 
C
1,000,000
1
Hydrochloric Acid (1% solution)
I
100,000
2
Vomit, Lemons
D
10,000
3
Boric acid (1% solution), wines
I
1,000
4
Beer, grape juice
C
100
5
Boric Acid (1% solution), (eye drops)
10
6
Milk, saliva
--
0
7
NEUTRAL
A
10
8
Baking Soda (1% solution)
L
100
9
Borax (1% solution)
K
1,000
10
Upper limit for most stain-resist nylon
A
10,000
11
Ammonia (1% solution), soda ash (1% solution)
L
100,000
12
TSP (1% solution)
I
1,000,000
13
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye) (1% solution)
N
10,000,000
14
 
E
 
 

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